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Harley-Davidson Museum unveils tsunami motorcycle

Oxford (29 October 2012) - A trip to the Harley-Davidson Museum in Milwaukee has to feature high on every enthusiast’s to do list and the unveiling of the museum’s latest exhibit is testament to that special bond the iconic Motor Company has with its bike owners. This month a special display was showcased featuring Ikuo Yokoyama’s Harley-Davidson® motorcycle that drifted for more than a year across the Pacific Ocean following the tragic tsunami that devastated parts of northern Japan last year.

The 2004 Harley-Davidson FXSTB Softail Night Train, recovered off the coast of British Columbia by Peter Mark, is being displayed at Yokoyama’s request. He asked to have the motorcycle preserved in its current condition and displayed at the Harley-Davidson Museum as a memorial to those whose lives were lost or forever changed by the 2011 tsunami in Japan.

“We’re truly humbled to display Mr. Yokoyama’s motorcycle,” said Bill Davidson, Vice President of the Harley-Davidson Museum. “This motorcycle has an amazing story to tell, and we are honored to be able to share it.”

The remarkable story of the motorcycle’s survival and recovery made international headlines after Mark found it washed ashore on a remote beach on British Columbia’s Graham Island at low tide. He discovered the motorcycle, still bearing its Japanese license plate, in a container where the bike was being stored by Yokoyama.

Working with news agencies and representatives from Deeley Harley-Davidson Canada and Harley-Davidson Japan, contact was made with Yokoyama, who lost his home and currently lives in temporary housing in Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. Still struggling to rebuild his life in the aftermath of the disaster, Yokoyama declined Harley-Davidson’s offer to return the bike to him, although he was grateful for the offer and touched by the outpouring of support from Harley riders around the world.

tsunami bike

 

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